Music: B.M. Course Offerings

The Boston Conservatory at Berklee’s four-year B.M. programs vary in required credits. The courses outlined below are offered to undergraduate music students.

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Applied Lessons

 

M-AP 0009 Applied Lesson
1 hour weekly; 3 credits                 
 
M-AP 0091 Applied Concentrate
0.5 hour weekly; 1 credit                
 
M-AP 0093 Applied Concentrate
1 hour weekly; 2 credits                 

M-AP 3001 Junior Recital
One arranged performance; 0 credits (Pass/Fail)
Preparation and performance of a public recital by students in a B.M. program.

M-AP 4001 Senior Recital
One arranged performance; 0 credits (Pass/Fail)
Preparation and performance of a public recital by students in a B.M. program.

Ensembles

M-EN 0703 Conductors’ Choir
2 hours weekly; 0 credits
Boston Conservatory Conductors’ Choir is a 16-person voice performing ensemble modeled after professional choirs. The ensemble is a training ground for future professional choristers and conductors. The class meets weekly, and each member of the ensemble receives a small scholarship for their participation. The Conductors’ Choir performs four times each year under the direction of graduate students in choral conducting. Repertoire includes a cappella works from all the periods and chamber music.
By invitation only.
 
M-EN 0005 Conductors’ Orchestra

2 hours weekly; 0 credits
Boston Conservatory Conductors’ Orchestra is a non-performing ensemble for orchestral conducting students. The class meets weekly, and each member of the orchestra receives a small scholarship to play in this ensemble.
By invitation only.
 
M-EN 0069 Instrumental Ensemble   
                                       
2–12 hours weekly; 1 credit
Students majoring in brass, string, woodwind, and percussion performance are required to enroll in Instrumental Ensemble during each of their semesters in residence, to a maximum of eight. This includes Boston Conservatory ensembles such as Orchestra, Wind Ensemble, String Ensemble, Brass Ensemble, Percussion Ensemble, Saxophone Ensemble and all of the accompanying orchestras for dance, opera, and musical theater mainstage productions.

M-EN 0709 Choral Ensemble
3 hours weekly; 1 credit
Boston Conservatory Chorale and Boston Conservatory Women’s Chorus each perform three to four concerts per academic year, featuring premieres of new works, rarely performed works, and large works of the standard repertory with orchestra. Both ensembles perform annually with Boston Conservatory Orchestra, as well as with outside orchestras, or in special performances with one of the conservatory’s large ensembles.
 
M-EN 0079 Chamber Music
1 credit per group
Individual, on-going chamber ensembles are created at the beginning of each semester, assigned repertory, and coached. Students receive one credit for every group in which they participate. A maximum of two groups is allowed in a single semester. Note that M-EN 0079 is not a course, rather it is a registration placeholder required for assignment by faculty into any of the following Chamber Music options.

Fall 2016 and spring 2017 chamber music group options coming soon.

M-EN 0089 Classical Contemporary Music Ensemble
4–12 hours weekly; 1 credit
Boston Conservatory Classical Contemporary Music Ensemble performs six concerts per year: Four are masterworks concerts of major repertoire from the 20th and 21st century, and two are works by Boston Conservatory student composers. This ensemble is required for majors in the classical contemporary music performance program. It is also available to juniors, seniors, and graduate students by audition.

M-EN 0390 Composer’s Performance Ensemble
2 hours weekly; 1 credit
This course provides various coached ensemble experiences for composition majors as alternatives to The Boston Conservatory Chorale or the Instrumental Ensembles. The nature of the ensemble changes each semester depending upon the participants.

M-EN 0399 Improvisation Workshop
1.5 hours weekly; 1 credit
Progressive guided improvisations in small groups and ensembles. This work is centered around careful listening and avoids setting any stylistic limitations.

Orchestral Repertoire

Orchestral repertoire trains students in the art of orchestral preparation and performance through the examination of core repertoire. It also provides students with the opportunity to prepare and play core orchestral repertoire in an isolated setting (sectionals), without the stress of concert performance in mind.

M-EN 0001 Orchestral Repertoire 1
2 hours weekly; 1 credit
 
M-EN 0401 Orchestral Repertoire 1: Strings
2 hours weekly; 1 credit
 
M-EN 0002 Orchestral Repertoire 2
2 hours weekly; 1 credit
Prerequisite: M-EN 0001

M-EN 0402 Orchestral Repertoire 2: Strings
2 hours weekly; 1 credit
Prerequisite: M-EN 0401
 
M-EN 0003 Orchestral Repertoire 3

2 hours weekly; 1 credit
Prerequisite: M-EN 0002 or M-EN 0402
 
M-EN 0004 Orchestral Repertoire 4
2 hours weekly; 1 credit
Prerequisite: M-EN 0004

Core Courses

Music Theory

The four-semester Harmony & Counterpoint sequence provides the means and the vocabulary to understand, imitate, and analyze music of the common practice period: baroque, classic, and romantic (1600–1900).

M-SK 1191 Music Fundamentals
3 hours weekly; 2 credits

M-SK 1101 Harmony & Counterpoint 1
2 hours weekly; 2 credits

M-SK 1102 Harmony & Counterpoint 2
2 hours weekly; 2 credits
Prerequisite: M-EN 1101 or M-EN 1191
 
M-SK 2101 Harmony & Counterpoint 3
2 hours weekly; 2 credits
Prerequisite: M-SK 1102
 
M-SK 2102 Harmony & Counterpoint 4
2 hours weekly; 2 credits
Prerequisite: M-SK 2101
 
M-SK 1103  Ear Training 1

2 hours weekly, plus 25-minute dictation; 2 credits
 
M-SK 1104 Ear Training 2
2 hours weekly, plus 25-minute dictation; 2 credits
Prerequisite: M-SK 1103
 
M-SK 2103 Ear Training 3
2 hours weekly, plus 25-minute dictation; 2 credits
Prerequisite: M-SK 1104
 
M-SK 2104 Ear Training 4
2 hours weekly plus 25-minute dictation; 2 credits
Prerequisite: M-SK 2103
 
M-SK 1105 Time and Rhythm 1
1.5 hours weekly; 1 credit
This course develops the student’s sense of time (the perceived space between events and/or elements) and inner pulse using body movement, speaking, and clapping, and relates this to the student’s art form (instrument, dance, voice, etc.) through learned timing techniques and group exercises.

M-SK 1106 Time and Rhythm 2
1.5 hours weekly; 1 credit
This course focuses on rhythm (spaces and events within the perceived time) and applying it to the student’s art form using exercises and metronome techniques to improve execution and clarity of rhythm within time.
Prerequisite: M-SK 1105

Piano

M-SK 2601 Piano Class 1
1 hour weekly; 1 credit
 
M-SK 2602 Piano Class 2
1 hour weekly; 1 credit
Prerequisite: M-SK 2601

Music History

M-LT 1101 Music History 1: Ancient to Renaissance
2-hour lecture, 1-hour lab weekly; 3 credits
This class will cover techniques and styles of the following periods in music history: Ancient Greek Music, Medieval (c.450-1400), and Renaissance (c.1400-1600). The class will provide a survey of important composers and developments in music notation, theory and musical style. The class will also teach the basics of academic writing about music.
 
M-LT 1102 Music History 2: Baroque to Classical

2-hour lecture, 1-hour lab weekly; 2 credits
This class will cover techniques and styles of the following periods in music history: Baroque (1600-1750) and Classical (1725-1800). The class will emphasize methodologies and analytical tools that permit rigorous thinking, writing, listening and ultimately informed performing of those periods. Students will consider the works in historical context, intellectual and artistic trends and other social and cultural influences.. The class will also teach the basics of analytical academic writing and research techniques.
Prerequisite: M-LT 1101
 
M-LT 2101 Music History 3: Late Classical to Post-Romantic

2-hour lecture, 1-hour lab weekly; 3 credits
This class will cover techniques and styles of the following periods in music history: Late Classical (1800-1815) and Romantic and Post-Romantic Eras (1815-1900).. The class will emphasize methodologies and analytical tools that permit rigorous thinking, writing, listening and ultimately informed performing of those periods. Students will consider the works in historical  context, intellectual and artistic trends and other social and cultural influences.. The class will also teach  analytical academic writing and research techniques.
Prerequisite: M-LT 1102
 
M-LT 2102 Music History 4: Modern
2-hour lecture, 1-hour lab weekly; 3 credits
This course provides an understanding of contemporary and 20th-century music (1911 to the present day) through study of the major figures, works, institutions, stylistic developments, and intellectual themes related to art music of the modern era. Students will produce an academic research paper.
Prerequisite: M-LT 2101

Theory and Musicology Electives

Fall 2016

M-LT 71110 Score Reading 1
2 hours weekly; 2 credits
This class serves as an accelerated continuation of the ear training sequence with an emphasis on score reading. Beginning with a focus on singing in various clefs and transpositions, there will be a gradual increase in sight-reading and transposing at the keyboard as the semester progresses. Beginning repertoire consists of a combination of drills and a cross-section of works for small ensembles, from Renaissance motet, Bach chorales, Monteverdi overtures to Classical string quartets.
Prerequisite: M-SK 2102

M-LT 71112 Atonal Ear Training
2 hours weekly; 2 credits
This course is based primarily on the non-tonal vocal works of Debussy, Schoenberg, Berg, Ives, Bartok, Stravinsky, and Webern. This literature, as well as Edlund's Modus Novus, will provide a structured and comprehensive instruction in solfège, dictation, and oral analysis.
Prerequisite: M-SK 2102
 
M-LT 71113 Contemporary Compositional Techniques 1
2 hours weekly; 2 credits
This course will focus primarily on the music of the turn of the century to the Second World War. Attention will be paid to composers who sought to produce music through means not previously employed. The major focus will be on serialism, exoticism, and polystylism. The pedagogical approach will use score analysis, understanding context through a survey of related media, and simple model composition.
Prerequisite: M-SK 2102
 
M-LT 71116 Traditional Music of Europe
2 hours weekly; 2 credits
This course provides the means and the vocabulary to understand and discuss traditional music of a number of European countries. We will also examine the contributions of itinerate cultural groups such as the Roma and styles that exist across boundaries such as Klezmer. We will study the relationship of music to function in sacred and secular ritual, bardic traditions, song, dance, instrumental music etc. and the influence of these styles on concert music.
Prerequisite: M-SK 2102
 
M-LT 71118 Symphony in the Romantic Era

2 hours weekly; 2 credits
The generation of symphonic composers immediately after Beethoven famously struggled to compose in the shadow of his achievements. Further, though, they each brought a highly individual sensibility to their symphonic writing, colored by their work in other genres as well as by the ideas of the Romantic period. After a look at the three most influential Beethoven symphonies (5, 6, and 9), we will study symphonic works of Schubert, Schumann, Mendelssohn, Berlioz, and Liszt. We will consider the influence of—respectively—song, piano works, choral works, drama, and overtures on their symphonic styles and structures, as well as the ways in which they avoided the shadow of Beethoven and found their unique symphonic voices. The course will end with a look at some later followers of Beethoven—Brahms, Mahler, and Bruckner.
Prerequisite: M-SK 2102
 
M-LT 71120 Spectralism and After

2 hours weekly; 2 credits
This course will give a historical and theoretical framework for understanding the Spectralist movement, its proponents, and methods of analysis. Additionally, we will look at the widespread dominance of music centering on timbre as the primary musical parameter, and how this trend stems directly from Spectralism.
Prerequisite: M-SK 2102
 
M-LT 71121 The Music of Dutilleux
2 hours weekly; 2 credits
An exploration of the works of Dutilleux from the 1948 Piano Sonata to his final work, Le temps l'horloge. Focus on major works will include Métaboles for orchestra, the Second Symphony and his string quartet Ainsi la Nuit. Analysis of his works will center on harmonic language, orchestration, and the specific influence of Charles Koechlin. Special consideration will be given to Dutilleux’s distinctive orchestration style.
Prerequisite: M-SK 2102
 
M-LT 71123 Mozart
2 hours weekly; 2 credits
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, the man and his music, from his child prodigy tour of Europe until his untimely death while composing the Requiem will be studied in depth. Solomon’s biography of Mozart as well as Mozart’s own letters provide an excellent resource to explore the political, economic and social issues that impacted his work. All mediums, from solo piano to opera, will be examined.
Prerequisite: M-SK 2102
 
M-LT 71126 Takemitsu
2 hours weekly; 2 credits
Toru Takemitsu was a true iconoclast; one of the most important seminal composers of the 20th century. This course will examine pieces from his entire output including works for traditional Japanese instruments, solo piano music, orchestral music, chamber music, music for film, and transcriptions of popular music. We will also discuss his essays on art, music, and nature. Weekly homework for the course will be reading and listening assignments. Class discussion will be an integral part of the grade. Students will gain knowledge and understanding of Takemitsu’s unique aesthetic, his idiosyncratic harmonic language, and his compositional process.
Prerequisite: M-SK 2102
 
M-LT 71129 Tuning and Western Temperament Before 1900
2 hours weekly; 2 credits
The objectives of this course are to develop an understanding of the ways in which Western tuning systems have influenced the trajectory of music history by focusing on key composers and works. We will examine the consequences of the Pythagorean, meantone, well-tempered and equal-tempered tunings from ancient times up to 1900.
Prerequisite: M-SK 2102

Spring 2017

M-LT 71111 Score Reading 2
2 hours weekly; 2 credits
From playing minuets and trio movements from symphonies of Mozart and Haydn at the keyboard, the course materials increase in harmonic and rhythmic complexity; more-varied transposing instruments and larger forces are encountered as the semester progresses. The aim of this course is for students to be able to read a late Romantic and an early 20th century orchestral score at the keyboard.
Prerequisite: M-LT 71110

M-LT 71114 Contemporary Compositional Techniques 2
2 hours weekly; 2 credits
Understanding through imitation is the theme of Contemporary Composition Techniques 2. Seven two week modules are covered. The first week of each module is spent listening to, analyzing, and understanding the module's focus. The second week is spent composing a short work that successfully imitates techniques associated with the composers studied. The modules are graphic and non standard notation; extended techniques for winds and brass; extended techniques for percussion, piano, and strings; chance and improvisation; minimalism; spectralism; and music concrète.
Prerequisite: M-SK 2102
 
M-LT 71115 Complexity in Rhythm
2 hours weekly; 2 credits
A calisthenics-based approach to gaining fluency in a wide variety of 20th- and 21st-century rhythmic languages. The course will examine the origins and development, largely foreign to music pre-dating 1900, of unconventional beat subdivision (quintuplets, septuplets), irregular meter, metric modulation, additive rhythm, indeterminacy/graphic notation, and irrational rhythm through the music of composers such as Messiaen, Carter, Feldman, and Ferneyhough, among others. The goal will be to develop useful strategies for executing complex material while as well as providing a historical and theoretical context for this development. Course requirements include performance of exercises from literature and the textbook, graded sight-reading, several reading assignments, and a final project.
Prerequisite: M-SK 2102
 
M-LT 71116 Tuning and Western Temperament Since 1900
2 hours weekly; 2 credits
A history of the many tuning systems utilized in Western music beginning with equal temperament and including quarter tones and other smaller equal divisions, the Bohlen-Pierce scale and extended just intonation. We will explore the music and theories of Carrillo, Ives, Haba, Partch, Johnston, Stockhausen and others.
Prerequisite: M-SK 2102
 
M-LT 71118 Asian Influence on 20th Century Concert Music

2 hours weekly; 2 credits
Throughout the 20th century, Asian music and philosophy have influenced European and American concert music from timbres to pitch materials and formal structures. We will examine this influence on composers such as Debussy, Ravel, Bartok, Britten, Messiaen, Cage, Crumb and others.
Prerequisite: M-SK 2102
 
M-LT 71120 Russian Symphonic Tradition
2 hours weekly; 2 credits
Beginning with Tchaikovsky's Fourth and Sixth Symphonies, and ending with Shostakovich's Fifth Symphony, this course will cover symphonies and symphonic poems by 19th- and 20th- century Russian composers. Included will be music of Rimsky-Korsakov, Mussorgsky, Scriabin, Stravinsky, Prokofiev, and others. We will consider how these composers influenced one another and what makes the Russian symphonic tradition unique.
Prerequisite: M-SK 2102
 
M-LT 71123 Danish Composers of the Past Century
2 hours weekly; 2 credits
An overview of the major Danish composers of the last 100 years, with a focus on Nielsen, Holmboe,  Norgard, and Abrahamsen. The music of Denmark will be considered as an outgrowth of and a reaction to developments of the western European avant-garde. Analysis will center on the preference for hierarchical compositional systems found in this music. Other figures will include Langgaard, Gudmundsen-Holmgren, Ruders, Rasmussen, and Sorensen.
Prerequisite: M-SK 2102
 
M-LT 71125 Sketches from the Masters
2 hours weekly; 2 credits
From antiquity to present day, what sketches did the great composers leave behind? Is there a common thread that shows insight into the process of composing? Does this insight provide us with a greater depth when analyzing and interpreting music? Beethoven’s 5th Symphony and Stravinsky’s Rite of Spring are among the many masterpieces that will be explored.
Prerequisite: M-SK 2102
 
M-LT 71126 Sonata Style
2 hours weekly; 2 credits
Sonata Style examines, analyzes and explores the concept of Sonata form in Piano Music, String Quartets, Concertos, and Symphonies from its development in the dance music of the Baroque to various 20th century works that approach the genre with originality and freshness.   Scarlatti, CPE Bach, Mozart, Haydn, Beethoven, Schubert, Schumann, Brahms, Bartok and Stravinsky are among the composers that will be studied.
Prerequisite: M-SK 2102
 
M-LT 7 Immigrant Voices
2 hours weekly; 2 credits
In this course, we will listen to and analyze works by three immigrant composers (Korean-German, Israeli-American, and English-American). Unsuk Chin’s magical orchestration, Shulamit Ran’s gifted pacing, and Bernard Rand’s musical logic will be topics for discussion and we will research the expression of their national roots in the works.
Prerequisite: M-SK 2102

Major Requirements

M-PR 0009 Concert and Recital Attendance
Attendance at conservatory recitals and concerts (eight per semester) forms a vital part of the musician’s education as a listener and audience member. Matriculated students in all programs are required to register for Concert and Recital Attendance every semester in residence.
0 credits; Pass/Fail

Pedagogy

The study of principles and practices of music teaching focused on the student’s primary instrument, or voice. The discussion of methods and materials is followed by guided laboratory work with both class and private students. Course instructors may, at their discretion, assign external teaching work in the community to individual students as needed to reinforce the course curriculum/course objectives.

M-PD 0201 Pedagogy 1: Brass
1 hour weekly; 1 credit
 
M-PD 0202 Pedagogy 2: Brass

1 hour weekly; 1 credit
Prerequisite: M-PD 0201
 
M-PD 0401 Pedagogy 1: Strings
1 hour weekly; 1 credit
 
M-PD 0402 Pedagogy 2: Strings
1 hour weekly; 1 credit
Prerequisite: M-PD 0401
 
M-PD 0431 Pedagogy 1: Harp
1 hour weekly; 1 credit
 
M-PD 0432 Pedagogy 2: Harp
1 hour weekly; 1 credit
Prerequisite: M-PD 0431
 
M-PD 0501 Pedagogy: Percussion

2 hours weekly; 2 credits
 
M-PD 0601 Pedagogy 1: Piano

1 hour weekly; 1 credit
 
M-PD 0602 Pedagogy 2: Piano
1 hour weekly; 1 credit
Prerequisite: M-PD 0601
 
M-PD 0711 Pedagogy 1: Voice

1 hour weekly; 1 credit
This course is designed to familiarize the student with the anatomy and physiology of the singing voice and to expose them to the most recent scientific information available regarding voice and the teaching of singing. Students will develop a basic understanding of the function of the four major systems in singing as well as learn a vocabulary for pedagogical communication. The students are required to demonstrate the ability to formulate and express concepts of vocal function in presentations, in lessons, and in writing. The musical emphasis of the class is on standard classical song repertoire. However, students will be introduced to repertoire and pedagogical concepts related to musical theater. Students will utilize their knowledge through an applied teaching practicum in the second semester.

M-PD 0712 Pedagogy 2: Voice
1 hour weekly; 1 credit
Prerequisite: M-PD 0701
 
M-PD 0801 Pedagogy 1: Winds

1 hour weekly; 1 credit
 
M-PD 0802 Pedagogy 2: Winds

1 hour weekly; 1 credit
Prerequisite: M-PD 0801

Performance Seminar

Area seminars provide a locus for student and faculty performances, lectures, and discussion concerning instrument playing, preparation for the profession, work in audition techniques, and guest master classes.

M-ST 0209 Performance Seminar: Brass
2 hours weekly; 1 credit
 
M-ST 0309 Composition Seminar
2 hours weekly; 1 credit
A forum for special projects, professional development, recent contemporary music, vernacular music, visits by composers and performers, analogies to other art forms, issues of orchestration, instrumentation, structure, and form. Required of composition majors.
 
M-ST 0419 Performance Seminar: String
2 hours weekly; 1 credit
 
M-ST 0429 Performance Seminar: Double Bass
2 hours weekly; 1 credit
Each week, the class alternates focus on solo repertoire with orchestral excerpt/audition training. Faculty work on technical issues specific to bass and improving ensemble section playing. Using video recording and mock auditions (judged by a panel of Boston Symphony Orchestra players), the seminar prepares students to take professional orchestral auditions.

M-ST 0439 Performance Seminar: Harp
2 hours weekly; 1 credit
 
M-ST 0509 Performance Seminar: Percussion
2 hours weekly; 1 credit
Each semester, these sessions will encompass department performance classes, and classes by faculty and visiting artists. Department performance classes include two focusing on solo performance, and two on orchestral excerpts. Percussion students are expected to perform twice (on one of each).
 
M-ST 0619 Performance Seminar: Piano
2 hours weekly; 1 credit
Weekly forum required for all Piano Performance majors for all four years of study. Student and guest performances. Regular master classes by guest pianists and piano faculty. Focus on student performing, with discussion of performance anxiety, memory, interpretation, recordings, competitions, practicing, and all issues pertinent to performing. Students are encouraged to pursue performance opportunities and course instructors may, at their discretion, assign external performance work in the community to individual students as needed to reinforce the course curriculum.

M-ST 1711 Performance Seminar 1: Voice
M-ST 1712 Performance Seminar 2: Voice

2 hours weekly; 1 credit
Introduction to and overview of the basic principles of performance in recital, through exercises, assigned reading, observation, and performance.

M-ST 2711 Performance Seminar 3: Voice
2 hours weekly; 1 credit
A study of the principles of the Alexander Technique through discussion, experiential learning, and movement with hands-on guidance. This course covers basic body mapping and anatomy to support the understanding of the Technique which are then applied to singing and performing in the class. Topics include breath, balance, reaction and performance anxiety, kinesthetic awareness, mind/body awareness and efficient use of energy. Students acquire tools for better self-monitoring and care, and freedom in their own practice and performance. Offered fall semester only.
 
M-ST 2712 Performance Seminar 4: Voice
This one-semester course introduces students to the basic skills that are needed in performing opera. The focus of the course is on the development of the singing actor’s physical and emotional “instruments” and the coordination of these with their vocalism. Specific areas of study include: basic stage deportment, the nature of energy and its physical and emotional application for the performer, theatrical elements and how they affect character development and performance practice, making active choices as a performer, and balancing core truth with theatricality and stylistic considerations. The class is highly interactive and experiential, combining class discussions with various exercises. Students apply what they are learning to the performance of arias and/or songs for feedback and workshop within the class. There is no public performance aspect to this course.
4 hours weekly; 1 credit
 
M-ST 3711 Performance Seminar 5: Voice
M-ST 3712 Performance Seminar 6: Voice

2 hours weekly; 1 credit
Introduction to the basic principles of performance in recital. Studies in concentration, physical and facial focus, text projection, and character development in the context of performance of songs and arias. This course prepares students for the performance of the junior recital.
 
M-ST 4711 Performance Seminar 7: Voice
M-ST 4712 Performance Seminar 8: Voice

2 hours weekly; 1 credit
The study of more advanced vocal repertoire, with an emphasis on physical characterization and deeper understanding and dramatic interpretation of texts in all languages. The study and integration of singing, movement, and acting, which lead to the performance of the senior recital. 

M-ST 0809 Performance Seminar: Woodwind
2 hours weekly; 1 credit

Brass

M-SK1201 Brass Fundamentals 1
1 hour weekly; 1 credit
Brass Fundamentals provides incoming undergraduate students the opportunity to work on basic brass skills at the outset of their degree. It is mostly an experiential class, which covers breathing, sight-reading, scales, warm-ups, solo performance, and practice skills. Students will play in most every class. This course is required for all incoming undergraduate Brass majors - freshmen and transfers.

M-SK 1202 Brass Fundamentals 2
1 hour weekly; 1 credit
Prerequisite: M-SK 1201

Composition

M-SK 1301 Instrumentation and Notation 1
2 hours weekly; 2 credits
M-SK 1302 Instrumentation and Notation 2
2 hours weekly; 2 credits
Prerequisite: M-SK 1301
This sequence will provide the student with a basic working knowledge of orchestral and band instrument sections and their associated notations. Score reading will be developed through in-class listening and analysis, while score setup, formatting, and transposition is approached through hands-on application of notation standards and practices covered in class.
 
M-SK 0301 Orchestration 1
2 hours weekly; 2 credits
Prerequisite: M-SK 1302
M-SK 0302 Orchestration 2
2 hours weekly; 2 credits
Prerequisite: M-SK 2301
This sequence provides the student with opportunities to creatively apply the basic knowledge of instrument families acquired in Instrumentation and Notation to homogeneous ensembles. Familiarity with and analysis of traditional and exceptional musical examples will provide the basis for the student’s own work.
 
M-SK 0391 Electronic Music 1
2 hours weekly; 2 credits
 
M-SK 0392 Electronic Music 2
2 hours weekly; 2 credits
Prerequisite: M-SK 0391

Piano

M-LT 0601 Piano Literature 1

1 hour weekly; 1 credit
 
M-LT 0602 Piano Literature 2
1 hour weekly; 1 credit
 
M-LT 0603 Piano Literature 3
1 hour weekly; 1 credit
 
M-LT 0604 Piano Literature 4

1 hour weekly; 1 credit
 
M-SK 0661 Keyboard Harmony 1

2 hours weekly; 2 credits
M-SK 0662 Keyboard Harmony 2
2 hours weekly; 2 credits
Prerequisite: M-SK 0661
Applied keyboard skills for piano majors with emphasis on harmonization (diatonic and chromatic functions), transposition, and traditional figured bass realization. Styles of harmonization extend from traditional accompaniment patterns to an introduction of contemporary 7th and 9th chords and lead sheet harmonization.

M-SK 0663 Keyboard Techniques
1 hour weekly; 1 credit
An intensive and personally fitted overview of piano technique (scales, arpeggios, double notes, touches, etc.), score-reading, and sight-reading techniques.

Strings

M-ST 0401 Orchestral Excerpts
1.5 hours bi-weekly; 1 credit
Preparation of standard orchestral excerpts essential in the competition for positions with all ensembles. Required of fourth-year violin, viola, and cello majors.

Voice

Diction

Introductory survey of diction and enunciation in English, Italian, German, and French rooted in intensive study of the International Phonetic Alphabet.

M-SK 1711 Survey of Diction 1
2 hours weekly; 1 credit
 
M-SK 1712 Survey of Diction 2
2 hours weekly; 1 credit
Prerequisite: M-SK 1711
 
M-SK 0711 Diction: Italian
2 hours weekly; 1 credit
Development of proper Italian enunciation for singing, an intensified application of the International Phonetic Alphabet, and a more sophisticated understanding of the Italian language through the study and performance of the repertoire. Designed to be taken concurrently with MU 345 Song Repertoire: Italian. Offered fall semester only.
 
M-SK 0712 Diction: German
2 hours weekly; 1 credit
Development of proper German enunciation for singing, an intensified application of the International Phonetic Alphabet, and a more sophisticated understanding of the language through the study and performance of the repertoire. Designed to be taken concurrently with MU 334 Song Repertoire: German. Offered in the spring semester only.
 
M-SK 0713 Diction: French
2 hours weekly; 1 credit
Development of proper French enunciation for singing, an intensified application of the International Phonetic Alphabet, and a more sophisticated understanding of the French language through the study and performance of the repertoire. Designed to be taken concurrently with MU 433 Song Repertoire: French. Offered fall semester only.
 
M-SK 0714 Diction: English and American

2 hours weekly; 1 credit
Development of proper enunciation for singing in English, through the study and performance of the repertoire, a more intensified application of the International Phonetic Alphabet, and training in the correction of regional speech. Designed to be taken concurrently with MU 434: Song Repertoire: English and American. Offered spring semester only.

Repertoire

M-LT 0711 Song Repertoire: Italian
2 hours weekly; 1 credit
A survey of the Italian song repertoire through lecture, discussion, and performance with a concentration on salient composers in the Italian language.  

M-LT 0712 Song Repertoire: German
2 hours weekly; 1 credit
A survey of the German song repertoire through lecture, discussion, and performance with a concentration on the important poets and composers in the German language.

M-LT 0713 Song Repertoire: French
2 hours weekly; 1 credit
A survey of the French song repertoire through lecture, discussion, and performance, with a concentration on the important poets and composers in the language.

M-LT 0714 Song Repertoire: English and American
2 hours weekly; 1 credit
A survey of the English and American song repertoire through lecture, discussion, and performance with a concentration on the salient poets and composers of England and America.

M-LT 0731 Choral Repertoire 1: Antiquity through Early Baroque Period
2 hours weekly; 1 credit
This course serves as both repertoire survey and discussion of performance practice topics from antiquity through the early Baroque. Students engage in projects centered on scholarly presentations, concert planning and programming, and assemble a database of repertoire from each period.
 
M-LT 0732 Choral Repertoire 2: Early Baroque through the Classical Period
2 hours weekly; 1 credit
This course serves as both repertoire survey and discussion of performance practice topics through the Baroque period. Students engage in projects centered on scholarly presentations, concert planning and programming, and assemble a database of repertoire from each period.
 
M-LT 0733 Choral Repertoire 3: 19th Century Music

2 hours weekly; 1 credit
This course serves as both repertoire survey and discussion of performance practice topics during the 19th century. Students engage in projects centered on scholarly presentations, concert planning and programming, and assemble a database of repertoire from each period.

M-LT 0734 Choral Repertoire 4: 20th and 21st Century Music
2 hours weekly; 1 credit
This course serves as both repertoire survey and discussion of performance practice topics from the 20th century to the present day. Students engage in projecfts cenetered on scholarly presentations, concert planning and programming, and assemble a database of repertoire from each period.
 
M-ST 77913 Oratorio Repertoire
2 hours weekly; 1 credit
A survey of the history, performance practice, and repertoire of oratorio studied through lecture, performance, and coaching of arias and ensembles from selected oratorios from throughout the history of the genre.
 
M-ST 77916 Early Music Repertoire
2 hours weekly; 1 credit
This one-semester course is an exploration of the solo vocal repertoire composed before 1800, with special emphasis on nine selected genres. The course includes class lectures, preparation and coaching of music, and written and performance projects.

M-ST 77917 International Repertoire
2 hours weekly; 1 credit
An overview of song repertoire not covered in French, Italian, German, and English courses; namely, Russian/Slavic, Spanish/Iberian, and Scandinavian song repertoire.
 
M-AP 0701 Vocal Coaching
30-minute coaching weekly; 1 credit
Individual instruction in the interpretation, phrasing, diction, and style in all genres of the vocal repertoire. In collaboration with the applied lesson instructor, the vocal coach will assist in the choice and preparation of repertoire to be presented in required recitals.
 
M-EN 0701 Vocal/Piano Duos
2 hours weekly; 1 credit
An examination of the song repertoire of a single major composer through the lens of collaboration. A performance based repertoire class addressing the basic skills of ensemble, balance, style, and interpretation.

Opera

M-ST 0711 Acting for Singers 1
4 hours weekly; 2 credits
Basic principles of truthful acting. The course moves from foundation exercises to experience with monologues and scene work.
 
M-ST 0712 Acting for Singers 2
4 hours weekly; 2 credits
 
M-EN 0791 Opera Workshop
4 hours weekly; 1 credit
The Opera Workshop builds on the fundamentals learned in Introduction to Opera and through the students’ previous experience. Through interactive discussion, exercises, experiential projects, and the preparation and performance of appropriate arias and scenes, students will expand their knowledge base and experience practical application of the concepts and techniques they learn. Appropriate repertoire will be assigned, coached, rehearsed, and presented both in-class and in public performances.
By audition only.
 
M-EN 0793 Opera Studio
6-10 hours weekly; 1 credit
Opera Studio is the advanced performing ensemble of the Opera department. The emphasis of Opera Studio will be on application of the knowledge and technique learned throughout the curriculum in the preparation and performance of operatic repertoire. The class will include intensive coaching and musical preparation of mainstage operas, as well as coachings and musical and staging rehearsals for scenes programs, outreach events, one-acts, and the concert opera. In-class as well as public performances will be presented by the Opera Studio ensemble.
By audition only.

M-LT 77911 Characterization
Students learn the process of developing an operatic character, beginning with in-depth research into the opera, its source material, musical and dramatic values, and performance history. Context for the opera’s plot, including period, location, social milieu, and thematic material is also explored. With this foundation in place, the students identify character attributes, craft appropriate back story, examine relationships with other characters, and explore the inner life and outer physicality of the character. Finally, they carefully consider the character’s intentions and the obstacles to achieving them, from which they construct a range of acceptable choices of action to play in performance. Students will explore the character’s physicality and inner life through various performance exercises and will prepare and present an aria from the role in class.
2 hours weekly; 1 credit
 
M-LT 77912 The Drama of the Score
2 hours weekly; 1 credit
An introduction to the musical language of opera. Exploration of the musical and physical drama inherent in the orchestral score. Analysis of the operatic score as a tool for making dramatic and physical choices in the performance of arias from all historical periods and styles.
 
M-SK 0721 The Business of the Opera Business
2 hours weekly; 1 credit
This course offers practical approaches to the business aspects of building and sustaining a career in professional opera. Presentations by faculty and guest industry professionals will cover such topics as writing a personal mission statement, building a brand identity, creating business plans, assembling a team of advisors, working with agents and managers, tax advice for singers, financial planning for short- and long-term goals, surviving survival jobs, living in New York City, finding a voice teacher and/or coach, and building a website. The course will also discuss life on the road, including how to be a good colleague, manage company expectations, and get rehired; how to maintain vocal, physical, and emotional health while away from home; and guidance related to working abroad. Facing career transitions, including setting benchmarks for success and exploring other career trajectories within the business, will be discussed.
Instructor permission required.

M-ST 77910 Movement for Singers 1
2 hours weekly; 1 credit
M-ST 77911 Movement for Singers 2
2 hours weekly; 1 credit
Prerequisite: M-ST 77910
Designed to give the singing performer greater knowledge of and ability with their physical instrument. Introduction to basic dance steps, period movement, styles, and dances often required in operatic productions, and some basic ballet. Movement exercises from various well-known techniques in expressive bodywork (Chekhov, Bogart, Wesley Balk, Grotowski) as well as stage combat and some relaxation and massage techniques.
 
M-ST 77912 Aria Class
2 hours weekly; 1 credit
A performing and coaching class to which singers bring arias for performance practice as well as for coaching on diction, style, character, and vocal presentation.

M-ST 77914 Recitative
2 hours weekly; 1 credit
A study of recitativo in opera and oratorio in all languages and styles, including detailed work on the recitativo secco of Mozart and Rossini.

M-ST 77915 Audition Techniques
2 hours weekly; 1 credit
This course is a performance class focused on preparing students to be more effective in auditions.  Students will prepare and present a minimum of three audition arias that best reflect their talent and abilities, while satisfying language requirements and covering a variety of musical styles. Lectures and interactive discussions will be held on how to present yourself as a complete, consistent, and industry-ready package; understanding auditioning as a career-long process; creating effective audition materials; appropriate wardrobe and grooming; audition procedures and etiquette; contact with companies to arrange auditions, ask questions, and follow-up; creating a seasonal audition plan, including targeting appropriate companies, setting realistic goals, and monitoring progress. The class culminates in a mock audition for a panel of faculty and guest industry professionals.

Voice Electives

M-SK 0703 Linklater: Body, Voice, Text
2 hours, 1 credit
In depth practice of the body, voice, and text work defined by theater visionary and practitioner Kristen Linklater in her book, Freeing the Natural Voice.
 
M-LT 77910 Special Topics in Voice: Song Analysis Through Text
2 hours weekly; 1 credit
This one-semester course is a detailed exploration of the art song genre, especially its poetic and musical content and related performance issues. The course includes class lectures, analysis of selected works, and written and performance projects.

General Music

M-PR 70912 Alexander Technique
2 hours weekly; 1 credit
An introduction to F.M. Alexander’s techniques of body and mind awareness, alignment, and relaxation for the performing musician.
 
M-PR 70910 The Creative Musician
2 hours weekly; 1 credit
Course objectives are to discern each student’s personal goals in music, to expand our awareness of what is possible to do as musicians, to cultivate each person’s creativity as an individual and as a collaborator, and to explore each student’s potential as an imaginative performer, teacher, colleague, and creative being. This course challenges students with creative assignments and materials; includes guest presenters such as innovative performers, child development specialists, and therapeutic musicians; expands awareness of other art forms; introduces modern teaching techniques such as Dalcroze and Music for People; and provides a place for open dialogue. Offered in the fall semester only.

M-PR 07911 Career Skills for Musicians
2 hours weekly; 1 credit
The goal of this course is to prepare students to seek, fill, and devise opportunities for careers as musicians in the future by learning and experiencing the necessary perspectives, attitudes, and skills to pursue and maintain satisfying and profitable careers in the broad area of music. This includes producing materials to identify and promote themselves, financial, tax, and legal information; entrepreneurial projects that research and explore career possibilities; and experiencing and deepening their creative potentials as musicians, as colleagues, and as participants in our society. Offered in the spring semester only.

M-SK 0991 Conducting 1
1 hour weekly; 1 credit
M-SK 0992 Conducting 2
1 hour weekly; 1 credit
Prerequisite: M-SK 0991
The elementary technique of conducting applied to both choral and instrumental music. Principles of attack and release, setting and changing tempo, phrasing and interpretation; practice in score reading.
 
M-PR 00912 Independent Study
3 hours weekly; 1 credit
M-PR 00913 Independent Study
6 hours weekly; 2 credits
Students may petition to do independent work mentored by a music division faculty member. Approval is granted when the project specified is substantive, meaningful, and is something that the individual student can accomplish through primarily independent work.
 
M-LT 2051 The Musician as Educator​​​

2 hours weekly; 1 credit
An introduction to music education as a vocation and a profession; offers performance majors considering the Concentration in Music Education an opportunity to assess the field itself and their own aptitudes for teaching. Through readings, discussions, and selected observations in the field students develop skills in observing educational situations and settings and a “teacher’s perspective,” coming to see schools as productive workplaces and teachers as valuable colleagues.
 
M-LT 0051 Child Growth and Human Development
3 hours weekly; 3 credits
The study of normal growth and development from childhood through maturity, with emphasis on cognitive processes, language development, and patterns of psycho-social development. Explores the social and cultural contexts in which growth and development occur. Students demonstrate openness and objectivity towards issues and theories by inspecting their own biases.