Music: M.M. Course Offerings

Boston Conservatory at Berklee’s M.M. programs are two years in length and vary in credit requirements, depending on speciality. The courses outlined below are offered to graduate music students.

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Applied Lessons

M-AP 0009 Applied Lesson
1 hour weekly; 3 credits
This weekly one-hour lesson serves as a student's primary private lesson.
 
M-AP 0091 Applied Concentrate
0.5 hour weekly; 1 credit
This weekly half-hour lesson serves as a student's secondary private lesson.                
 
M-AP 0093 Applied Concentrate
1 hour weekly; 2 credits                 
This weekly one-hour lesson serves as a student's secondary private lesson.   

M-AP 5001 Graduate Recital
Arranged; 0 credits; Pass/Fail
Preparation and performance of a public recital by graduate students in the first year of their program.

M-AP 6001 Graduate Recital
Arranged; 0 credits; Pass/Fail
Preparation and performance of a public recital by graduate students in the final year of their program

Ensembles

M-EN 0703 Conductors’ Choir
2 hours weekly; 0 credits
Boston Conservatory Conductors’ Choir is a 16-person voice performing ensemble modeled after professional choirs. The ensemble is a training ground for future professional choristers and conductors. The class meets weekly, and each member of the ensemble receives a small scholarship for their participation. The Conductors’ Choir performs four times each year under the direction of graduate students in choral conducting. Repertoire includes a cappella works from all the periods and chamber music.
By invitation only.
 
M-EN 0005 Conductors’ Orchestra
2 hours weekly; 0 credits
Boston Conservatory Conductors’ Orchestra is a non-performing ensemble for orchestral conducting students. The class meets weekly, and each member of the orchestra receives a small scholarship to play in this ensemble.
By invitation only.

M-EN 0069 Instrumental Ensemble  
2–12 hours weekly; 1 credit                                        
Students majoring in Brass, String, Woodwind and Percussion performance are required to enroll in Instrumental Ensemble during each of their semesters in residence, to a maximum of eight. This includes ensembles such as Orchestra, Wind Ensemble, String Ensemble, Brass Ensemble, Percussion Ensemble, Saxophone Ensemble and all of the accompanying orchestras for Opera, Dance and Musical Theater.
 
M-EN 0709 Choral Ensemble
3 hours weekly; 1 credit
The Boston Conservatory Chorale and the Women’s Chorus each perform three to four concerts every year, featuring premieres of new works, rarely performed works and large works of the standard repertory with orchestra. Both ensembles perform annually with The Boston Conservatory Orchestra, as well as with outside orchestras or in special performances with one of The Boston Conservatory’s large ensembles.
 
M-EN 0079 Chamber Music
1 credit per group
Individual, on-going chamber ensembles are created at the beginning of each semester, assigned repertory, and coached. Students receive one credit for every group in which they participate. A maximum of two groups is allowed in a single semester. Note that M-EN 0079 is not a course, rather it is a registration placeholder required for assignment by faculty into any of the following Chamber Music options.

Fall 2016 and spring 2017 chamber group options coming soon.

 
M-EN 0089 Classical Contemporary Music Ensemble
4–12 hours weekly; 1 credit
Boston Conservatory Classical Contemporary Music Ensemble performs six concerts per year: Four are masterworks concerts of major repertoire from the 20th and 21st century and two are works by Boston Conservatory student composers. This ensemble is required for majors in the classical contemporary music performance program. It is also available to juniors, seniors and graduate students by audition.

Orchestral Repertoire

The following orchestral repertoire courses are offered to train students in the art of orchestral preparation and performance through the examination of core repertoire. These courses also provides students with the opportunity to prepare and play core orchestral repertoire in an isolated setting (sectionals), without the stress of concert performance in mind:

M-EN 0001 Orchestral Repertoire 1
2 hours weekly; 1 credit
 
M-EN 0401 Orchestral Repertoire 1: Strings
2 hours weekly; 1 credit
 
M-EN 0002 Orchestral Repertoire 2
2 hours weekly; 1 credit
Prerequisite: M-EN 0001
 
M-EN 0402 Orchestral Repertoire 2: Strings
2 hours weekly; 1 credit
Prerequisite: M-EN 0401
 

The following courses are offered to train students in the art of orchestral preparation and performance through the examination of core repertoire. Unlike MU 109, this ensemble rehearses weekly as a full orchestra:

 
M-EN 0003 Orchestral Repertoire 3
2 hours weekly; 1 credit
Prerequisite: M-EN 0002 or M-EN 0402
 
M-EN 0004 Orchestral Repertoire 4
2 hours weekly; 1 credit
Prerequisite: M-EN 0003
 
M-EN 0390 Composer’s Performance Ensemble
2 hours weekly; 1 credit
This course provides various coached ensemble experiences for composition majors as alternatives to The Boston Conservatory Chorale or the Instrumental Ensembles. The nature of the ensemble changes each semester depending upon the participants.
 
M-EN 0399 Improvisation Workshop

1.5 hours weekly; 1 credit
Progressive guided improvisations in small groups and ensembles. This work is centered around careful listening and avoids setting any stylistic limitations.

Major Requirements

M-PR 0009 Concert and Recital Attendance
0 credits; Pass/Fail
Attendance at Boston Conservatory recitals and concerts (eight per semester) forms a vital part of the musician’s education as a listener and audience member. Matriculated students in all programs are required to register for Concert and Recital Attendance every semester in residence.

Pedagogy

The study of principles and practices of music teaching focused on the student’s primary instrument, or voice. The discussion of methods and materials is followed by guided laboratory work with both class and private students. Course instructors may, at their discretion, assign external teaching work in the community to individual students as needed to reinforce the course curriculum/course objectives. 

M-PD 0201 Pedagogy 1: Brass
1 hour weekly; 1 credit
 
M-PD 0202 Pedagogy 2: Brass
1 hour weekly; 1 credit
Prerequisite: M-PD 0201
 
M-PD 0401 Pedagogy 1: Strings
1 hour weekly; 1 credit
 
M-PD 0402 Pedagogy 2: Strings
1 hour weekly; 1 credit
Prerequisite: M-PD 0401
 
M-PD 0431 Pedagogy 1: Harp
1 hour weekly; 1 credit
 
M-PD 0432 Pedagogy 2: Harp
1 hour weekly; 1 credit
Prerequisite: M-PD 0431
 
M-PD 0501 Pedagogy: Percussion
2 hours weekly; 2 credits
 
M-PD 0601 Pedagogy 1: Piano
1 hour weekly; 1 credit
 
M-PD 0602 Pedagogy 2: Piano

1 hour weekly; 1 credit
Prerequisite: M-PD 0601
 
M-PD 0711 Pedagogy 1: Voice
1 hour weekly; 1 credit
This course is designed to familiarize the student with the anatomy and physiology of the singing voice and to expose them to the most recent scientific information available regarding voice and the teaching of singing. Students will develop a basic understanding of the function of the four major systems in singing as well as learn a vocabulary for pedagogical communication. The students are required to demonstrate the ability to formulate and express concepts of vocal function in presentations, in lessons, and in writing. The musical emphasis of the class is on standard classical song repertoire. However, students will be introduced to repertoire and pedagogical concepts related to musical theater. Students will utilize their knowledge through an applied teaching practicum in the second semester.
 
M-PD 0712 Pedagogy 2: Voice
1 hour Weekly; 1 credit
Prerequisite: M-PD 0701
 
M-PD 0801 Pedagogy 1: Winds
1 hour weekly; 1 credit
 
M-PD 0802 Pedagogy 2: Winds
1 hour weekly; 1 credit
Prerequisite: M-PD 0801

Performance Seminar

Area seminars provide a locus for student and faculty performances, lectures, and discussion concerning instrument playing, preparation for the profession, work in audition techniques, and guest master classes.

M-ST 0209 Performance Seminar: Brass
2 hours weekly; 1 credit
 
M-ST 0309 Composition Seminar
2 hours weekly; 1 credit
A forum for special projects, professional development, recent contemporary music, vernacular music, visits by composers and performers, analogies to other art forms, issues of orchestration, instrumentation, structure, and form. Required of composition majors.
 
M-ST 0419 Performance Seminar: String
2 hours weekly; 1 credit
 
M-ST 0429 Performance Seminar: Double Bass
2 hours weekly; 1 credit
Each week, the class alternates focus on solo repertoire with orchestral excerpt/audition training. Faculty work on technical issues specific to bass and improving ensemble section playing. Using video recording and mock auditions (judged by a panel of Boston Symphony Orchestra players), the seminar prepares students to take professional orchestral auditions.
 
M-ST 0439 Performance Seminar: Harp

2 hours weekly; 1 credit
 
M-ST 0509 Performance Seminar: Percussion
2 hours weekly; 1 credit
Each semester, these sessions will encompass department performance classes, and classes by faculty and visiting artists. Department performance classes include two focusing on solo performance, and two on orchestral excerpts. Percussion students are expected to perform twice (on one of each).
 
M-ST 0619 Performance Seminar: Piano
2 hours weekly; 1 credit
Weekly forum required for all Piano Performance majors for all four years of study. Student and guest performances. Regular master classes by guest pianists and piano faculty. Focus on student performing, with discussion of performance anxiety, memory, interpretation, recordings, competitions, practicing, and all issues pertinent to performing. Students are encouraged to pursue performance opportunities and course instructors may, at their discretion, assign external performance work in the community to individual students as needed to reinforce the course curriculum.

M-ST 5711 Graduate Performance Seminar
2 hours weekly; 1 credit
Performance Seminar is a one semester class preparatory to both the graduate recital as well as to M-ST 77915 Audition Techniques. Emphasis is on translation and free expression of text; physical comfort and expressivity; balancing physical and energetic bodies; and managing the mind.
 
M-ST 0809 Performance Seminar: Woodwind
2 hours weekly; 1 credit

Music Theory

Theory & Musicology Electives

Fall 2016

M-LT 71110 Score Reading 1
2 hours weekly; 2 credits
This class serves as an accelerated continuation of the ear training sequence with an emphasis on score reading. Beginning with a focus on singing in various clefs and transpositions, there will be a gradual increase in sight-reading and transposing at the keyboard as the semester progresses. Beginning repertoire consists of a combination of drills and a cross-section of works for small ensembles, from Renaissance motet, Bach chorales, Monteverdi overtures to Classical string quartets.
Prerequisite: M-EX 5107 Graduate Harmony Proficiency Exam; or M-SK 8101
 
M-LT 71112 Atonal Ear Training
2 hours weekly; 2 credits
This course is based primarily on the non-tonal vocal works of Debussy, Schoenberg, Berg, Ives, Bartok, Stravinsky, and Webern. This literature, as well as Edlund's Modus Novus, will provide a structured and comprehensive instruction in solfège, dictation, and oral analysis.
Prerequisite: M-EX 5107 Graduate Harmony Proficiency Exam; or M-SK 8101
 
M-LT 71113 Contemporary Compositional Techniques 1
2 hours weekly; 2 credits
This course will focus primarily on the music of the turn of the century to the Second World War. Attention will be paid to composers who sought to produce music through means not previously employed. The major focus will be on serialism, exoticism, and polystylism. The pedagogical approach will use score analysis, understanding context through a survey of related media, and simple model composition.
Prerequisite: M-EX 5107 Graduate Harmony Proficiency Exam; or M-SK 8101

M-LT 71116 Traditional Music of Europe
2 hours weekly; 2 credits
This course provides the means and the vocabulary to understand and discuss traditional music of a number of European countries. We will also examine the contributions of itinerate cultural groups such as the Roma and styles that exist across boundaries such as Klezmer. We will study the relationship of music to function in sacred and secular ritual, bardic traditions, song, dance, instrumental music etc. and the influence of these styles on concert music.
Prerequisite: M-EX 5107 Graduate Harmony Proficiency Exam; or M-SK 8101

M-LT 71118 Symphony in the Romantic Era
2 hours weekly; 2 credits
The generation of symphonic composers immediately after Beethoven famously struggled to compose in the shadow of his achievements. Further, though, they each brought a highly individual sensibility to their symphonic writing, colored by their work in other genres as well as by the ideas of the Romantic period. After a look at the three most influential Beethoven symphonies (5, 6, and 9), we will study symphonic works of Schubert, Schumann, Mendelssohn, Berlioz, and Liszt. We will consider the influence of—respectively—song, piano works, choral works, drama, and overtures on their symphonic styles and structures, as well as the ways in which they avoided the shadow of Beethoven and found their unique symphonic voices. The course will end with a look at some later followers of Beethoven—Brahms, Mahler, and Bruckner.
Prerequisite: M-EX 5107 Graduate Harmony Proficiency Exam; or M-SK 8101

M-LT 71120 Spectralism and After
2 hours weekly; 2 credits
This course will give a historical and theoretical framework for understanding the Spectralist movement, its proponents, and methods of analysis. Additionally, we will look at the widespread dominance of music centering on timbre as the primary musical parameter, and how this trend stems directly from Spectralism.
Prerequisite: M-EX 5107 Graduate Harmony Proficiency Exam; or M-SK 8101

M-LT 71121 The Music of Dutilleux
2 hours weekly; 2 credits
An exploration of the works of Dutilleux from the 1948 Piano Sonata to his final work, Le temps l'horloge. Focus on major works will include Métaboles for orchestra, the Second Symphony and his string quartet Ainsi la Nuit. Analysis of his works will center on harmonic language, orchestration, and the specific influence of Charles Koechlin. Special consideration will be given to Dutilleux’s distinctive orchestration style.
Prerequisite: M-EX 5107 Graduate Harmony Proficiency Exam; or M-SK 8101

M-LT 71123 Mozart
2 hours weekly; 2 credits
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, the man and his music, from his child prodigy tour of Europe until his untimely death while composing the Requiem will be studied in depth. Solomon’s biography of Mozart as well as Mozart’s own letters provide an excellent resource to explore the political, economic and social issues that impacted his work. All mediums, from solo piano to opera, will be examined.
Prerequisite: M-EX 5107 Graduate Harmony Proficiency Exam; or M-SK 8101

M-LT 71126 Takemitsu
2 hours weekly; 2 credits
Toru Takemitsu was a true iconoclast; one of the most important seminal composers of the 20th Century. This course will examine pieces from his entire output including works for traditional Japanese instruments, solo piano music, orchestral music, chamber music, music for film, and transcriptions of popular music. We will also discuss his essays on art, music, and nature. Weekly homework for the course will be reading and listening assignments. Class discussion will be an integral part of the grade. Students will gain knowledge and understanding of Takemitsu’s unique aesthetic, his idiosyncratic harmonic language, and his compositional process.
Prerequisite: M-EX 5107 Graduate Harmony Proficiency Exam; or M-SK 8101

M-LT 71129 Tuning and Western Temperament Before 1900
2 hours weekly; 2 credits
The objectives of this course are to develop an understanding of the ways in which Western tuning systems have influenced the trajectory of music history by focusing on key composers and works. We will examine the consequences of the Pythagorean, meantone, well-tempered and equal-tempered tunings from ancient times up to 1900.
Prerequisite: M-EX 5107 Graduate Harmony Proficiency Exam; or M-SK 8101

Spring 2017

M-LT 71111 Score Reading 2
2 hours weekly; 2 credits
From playing minuets and trio movements from symphonies of Mozart and Haydn at the keyboard, the course materials increase in harmonic and rhythmic complexity; more-varied transposing instruments and larger forces are encountered as the semester progresses. The aim of this course is for students to be able to read a late Romantic and an early 20th century orchestral score at the keyboard.
Prerequisite: M-LT 71110
 
M-LT 71114 Contemporary Compositional Techniques 2
2 hours weekly; 2 credits
Understanding through imitation is the theme of Contemporary Composition Techniques 2. Seven two week modules are covered. The first week of each module is spent listening to, analyzing, and understanding the module's focus. The second week is spent composing a short work that successfully imitates techniques associated with the composers studied. The modules are graphic and non standard notation; extended techniques for winds and brass; extended techniques for percussion, piano, and strings; chance and improvisation; minimalism; spectralism; and music concrète.
Prerequisite: M-EX 5107 Graduate Harmony Proficiency Exam; or M-SK 8101

M-LT 71115 Complexity in Rhythm
2 hours weekly; 2 credits
A calisthenics-based approach to gaining fluency in a wide variety of 20th- and 21st-century rhythmic languages. The course will examine the origins and development, largely foreign to music pre-dating 1900, of unconventional beat subdivision (quintuplets, septuplets), irregular meter, metric modulation, additive rhythm, indeterminacy/graphic notation, and irrational rhythm through the music of composers such as Messiaen, Carter, Feldman, and Ferneyhough, among others. The goal will be to develop useful strategies for executing complex material while as well as providing a historical and theoretical context for this development. Course requirements include performance of exercises from literature and the textbook, graded sight-reading, several reading assignments, and a final project.
Prerequisite: M-EX 5107 Graduate Harmony Proficiency Exam; or M-SK 8101

M-LT 71116 Tuning and Western Temperament Since 1900
2 hours weekly; 2 credits
A history of the many tuning systems utilized in Western music beginning with equal temperament and including quarter tones and other smaller equal divisions, the Bohlen-Pierce scale and extended just intonation. We will explore the music and theories of Carrillo, Ives, Haba, Partch, Johnston, Stockhausen and others.
Prerequisite: M-EX 5107 Graduate Harmony Proficiency Exam; or M-SK 8101

M-LT 71118 Asian Influence on 20th Century Concert Music
2 hours weekly; 2 credits
Throughout the 20th century, Asian music and philosophy have influenced European and American concert music from timbres to pitch materials and formal structures. We will examine this influence on composers such as Debussy, Ravel, Bartok, Britten, Messiaen, Cage, Crumb and others.
Prerequisite: M-EX 5107 Graduate Harmony Proficiency Exam; or M-SK 8101

M-LT 71120 Russian Symphonic Tradition
2 hours weekly; 2 credits
Beginning with Tchaikovsky's Fourth and Sixth Symphonies, and ending with Shostakovich's Fifth Symphony, this course will cover symphonies and symphonic poems by 19th- and 20th- century Russian composers. Included will be music of Rimsky-Korsakov, Mussorgsky, Scriabin, Stravinsky, Prokofiev, and others. We will consider how these composers influenced one another and what makes the Russian symphonic tradition unique.
Prerequisite: M-EX 5107 Graduate Harmony Proficiency Exam; or M-SK 8101

M-LT 71123 Danish Composers of the Past Century
2 hours weekly; 2 credits
An overview of the major Danish composers of the last 100 years, with a focus on Nielsen, Holmboe,  Norgard, and Abrahamsen. The music of Denmark will be considered as an outgrowth of and a reaction to developments of the western European avant-garde. Analysis will center on the preference for hierarchical compositional systems found in this music. Other figures will include Langgaard, Gudmundsen-Holmgren, Ruders, Rasmussen, and Sorensen.
Prerequisite: M-EX 5107 Graduate Harmony Proficiency Exam; or M-SK 8101

M-LT 71125 Sketches from the Masters
2 hours weekly; 2 credits
From antiquity to present day, what sketches did the great composers leave behind? Is there a common thread that shows insight into the process of composing? Does this insight provide us with a greater depth when analyzing and interpreting music? Beethoven’s 5th Symphony and Stravinsky’s Rite of Spring are among the many masterpieces that will be explored.
Prerequisite: M-EX 5107 Graduate Harmony Proficiency Exam; or M-SK 8101

M-LT 71126 Sonata Style
2 hours weekly; 2 credits
Sonata Style examines, analyzes and explores the concept of Sonata form  in Piano Music, String Quartets, Concertos and Symphonies from its development in the dance music of the Baroque to various 20th century works that approach the genre with originality and freshness.   Scarlatti, CPE Bach, Mozart, Haydn, Beethoven, Schubert, Schumann, Brahms,  Bartok and Stravinsky are among the composers that will be studied.
Prerequisite: M-EX 5107 Graduate Harmony Proficiency Exam; or M-SK 8101

M-LT 7 Immigrant Voices
2 hours weekly; 2 credits
In this course, we will listen to and analyze works by three immigrant composers (Korean-German, Israeli-American, and English-American). Unsuk Chin’s magical orchestration, Shulamit Ran’s gifted pacing, and Bernard Rand’s musical logic will be topics for discussion and we will research the expression of their national roots in the works.
Prerequisite: M-EX 5107 Graduate Harmony Proficiency Exam; or M-SK 8101

Remedial Courses

M-SK 8101 Remedial Harmony
3 hours weekly; 1 credit
Students who do not pass M-EX 5107 Graduate Harmony Proficiency Exam are required to register for this review course. Incoming graduate students who may have had little harmony and counterpoint training or whose skills need refreshing take this course. Typically students are strong enough in the rudiments of voice leading but may have had less experience with form and structure, and with chromatic and extended harmony. The syllabus provides an overview of the information needed for harmonic analysis and understanding of form.
 
M-SK 8102 Remedial Ear Training
2.5 hours weekly; 1 credit
Students who do not pass M-EX 5105 Graduate Ear Training Proficiency Exam are required to register for this review course. Incoming graduate students who may have had little ear training or whose skills need refreshing take this course. Its purpose is to cover as much ground as possible in one semester in both sight-singing and dictation skills.

Music History

M-SK 5103 Writing About Music
1 hour weekly; 1 credit
This course prepares students for academic research and writing at the graduate level, resulting in a long research paper and paper presentation in the final weeks of the course. Topics include The Boston Conservatory’s Music Library and Resources; General Library Information and Cataloguing Systems; General Reference Materials (New Grove, MGG, Baker’s, etc.); Music Journals; Online Searching Techniques; Citation and Bibliography; Collected Works and Monuments.
 
M-SK 5104 Communicating About Music
1 hour weekly; 1 credit
This course prepares students for writing, presenting, and talking about music in a non-academic setting. Topics include: CV and Cover Letter; Program Notes; Pre-concert Talks; Music Appreciation Courses; Website Design; Grant Writing; Fundraising; Oral Comprehensive Exam Preparation.
 
M-LT 5105 Music History Survey
2 hours weekly; 1 credit

Graduate Music History Seminars

Fall 2016

M-LT 71310 Britten
3 hours weekly; 3 credits
Benjamin Britten dominated the world of English art music in the 20th century. While he rejected the post-war radical avant-garde approach to art music, his music is nonetheless challenging and rich, yet accessible to the public at large. This class will explore Britten’s unique compositional voice in the 20th century as well as his relationship to his musical past and his assimilation of foreign cultures.
Prerequisites: M-SK 5103, M-EX 5103 or M-LT 8102
 
M-LT 71311 Mahler and Esotericism

3 hours weekly; 3 credits
Demigods, Nordic myth, Zarathustra, Faust, alchemy, and archetypes will all be a part of this investigation of Mahler’s esoteric thinking as reflected in his symphonies. Moving chronologically through the symphonies, we will focus particularly on Symphonies 2 through 4, 7, and 8, and will make traditional analyses of musical form and content as well as considering narratives and extramusical meanings.
Prerequisites: M-SK 5103, M-EX 5103 or M-LT 8102
 
M-LT 71312 Bach, Handel, Vivaldi
3 hours weekly; 3 credits
This course considers three composers at a single moment in time: 1724. In this year, Bach premiered the Johannespassion in Leipzig, Handel introduced Julius Caesar to London audiences, and in Rome, Vivaldi's spectacular opera Giustino was performed for the first time. Themes and threads not visible in a single-composer course emerge from this type of study: the far-reaching influence of the castrato, shared principles for musical borrowing and recycling, and evidence of an increasingly cosmopolitan style of composition. Minor works by other contemporary composers fill out this survey of classical music in 1724.
Prerequisites: M-SK 5103; M-EX 5101 or M-LT 8101

M-LT 71313 The Mass
3 hours weekly; 3 credits
This course will explore the role of the Mass as both a liturgical model and a concert genre. From its origins in plainchant to modern-day “masses” that bear little relationship to the liturgy, the Mass is a polemical genre that reflects historical and ongoing tensions between the sacred and secular, as well as the liturgical and the theatrical. Students will investigate these tensions through close examination of  liturgical works ranging from Palestrina's Missa Papae Marcelli (1560s) to Morricone's Missa Papae Francisci (2015) as well as seminal "concert masses" by Beethoven, Stravinsky, Bernstein, and more contemporary works by Arvo Pärt, Brian Ferneyhough, Pascal Dusapin, and Einojuhani Rautavaara.
Prerequisites: M-SK 5103; M-EX 5101 or M-LT 8101; M-EX 5103 or M-LT 8102
 
M-LT 71319 Renaissance Madrigals
3 hours weekly; 3 credits
This course considers the music-text relationship in the Italian madrigal during the 16th and early 17th centuries, focusing on three aspects of this topic: evolving themes of love and sensuality in the first half of the 16th century; the emerging concept of the composer and performer as a "musical orator" around the mid-16th century; and the shift from the balanced polyphony of the early Renaissance to the experimentation and extravagance of composers such as Luca Marenzio, Carlo Gesualdo, and Claudio Monteverdi in the decades surrounding the turn of the 17th century.
Prerequisites: M-SK 5103; M-EX 5101 or M-LT 8101

Spring 2017

M-LT 71315 Opera History

3 hours weekly; 3 credits
This course examines the development of Opera throughout its 400-year history, from the beginnings in Florence at the end of the 16th century through the operas of the 21st century. Special attention will be given to seminal operas that define the genre in each stylistic period including the works by composers such as Monteverdi, Lully, Handel, Mozart, Rossini, Verdi, Wagner, Strauss, Berg, Britten, Glass, Adams among others
Prerequisites: M-SK 5103; M-EX 5101 or M-LT 8101; M-EX 5103 or M-LT 8102
 
M-LT 71320 19th century Art Song
3 hours weekly; 3 credits
The first part of this course will focus on songs from the German Lieder tradition, and will consider the nature of song cycles, text-music relationships, changing musical language, and the cultural and biographical contexts of songs by Schubert, Schumann, Brahms, Wagner, Wolf, and the "Second Viennese School" composers. We will then turn to songs from other traditions – English, French, Russian, American, and others – focusing on songs from the 19th and 20th and 21st centuries.
Prerequisites: M-SK 5103; M-EX 5103 or M-LT 8102

M-LT 71321 Schoenberg
3 hours weekly; 3 credits
Focusing on representative works from each of Schoenberg's compositional periods; from early Post-Romantic works such as Verklärte Nacht through works of the expressionist period in which Schoenberg first departed from tonality, continuing with serial works, and finally looking at late works such as Kol Nidre and the String Trio. Schoenberg's life will be considered against the backdrop of the first half of the 20th century, looking at influences on his music and thought and at his own significant influence as a teacher of the "Second Viennese School" composers and, later, in the United States.  
Prerequisites: M-SK 5103; M-EX 5103 or M-LT 8102

M-LT 71322 Mozart’s Life
3 hours weekly; 3 credits
Mozart was, perhaps the most important representative of High Viennese Classicism, yet during his lifetime many critics thought his music too complex and meant only for the connoisseur. This course will investigate why Mozart’s music was so challenging for his time and why it is still so relevant today.
Prerequisites: M-SK 5103; M-EX 5101 or M-LT 8101

M-LT 71323 Baroque Music
3 hours weekly; 3 credits
This course investigates mysteries of baroque music – some solved, others not – such as chorus size in Bach’s cantatas, instrumentation in Handel’s oratorios, and Vivaldi’s request for women to sing like men. The course opens with projects designed to familiarize students with handwritten scores, performing parts, and related materials. Students then apply skills acquired from these projects to specific case studies, including those mentioned above and in works by Monteverdi, Corelli, Gaultier, and others. Ultimately, the course increases the student’s command of source materials and performance practices in an effort to encourage study (and performance) of baroque music.
Prerequisites: M-SK 5103; M-EX 5101 or M-LT 8101

M-LT 71325 Tone Poem
3 hours weekly; 3 credits
A history of orchestral program music and the twisting of classical symphonic expectations in order to musically represent literary and philosophical ideas.
Prerequisites: M-SK 5103, M-EX 5103 or M-LT 8102

Special Topics in Music History

Fall 2016

M-LT 71410 Josquin
3 hours weekly: half-semester; 1.5 credits
Josquin des Prez was among the first composers to achieve international fame in Europe—hailed by Martin Luther as "the master of the notes”—thanks in part to his extensive travels, as well as the explosion of music printing brought about by the introduction of the printing press shortly before Josquin's birth. This course focuses on three aspects of Josquin’s music: reflections in his music of the rising Humanist philosophy; comparison of expressive techniques between his sacred and secular music; and his role in the growing public embrace of "composer-genius worship" during both the 16th and 20th centuries.
Prerequisites: M-SK 5103; M-EX 5101 or M-LT 8101
 
M-LT 71413 Water Music

3 hours weekly: half-semester; 1.5 credits
Many of us wonder at the beauty, magnitude, motion, and mystery contained in the large bodies of water that cover our planet. Composers have been inspired by the sea for centuries. In this course we will investigate how composers musically bridge the multiple chasms between humanity and the world of water, exploring pieces by Mendelssohn, Wagner, Rimsky-Korsakov, Debussy, Ravel, the British Pastoralists and Britten, Takemitsu, and Xenakis.
Prerequisites: M-SK 5103; M-EX 5103 or M-LT 8102
 
M-LT 71414 Satie and Dadaism
3 hours weekly: half-semester; 1.5 credits
As author Roger Nichols merrily states, “In the last two decades of his life, Satie had the slightly unusual experience of being ‘discovered’ three times.” Ravel, Diaghilev, and Cocteau each promoted the composer whom many considered (with some irony) ‘le bon Maitre’ of Les Six.  Satie epitomized the positivity of Esprit Nouveau in postwar France. In this course, we will examine how Satie’s lifetime devotion to the combination of economy and satiric imagination influenced the output of his contemporaries and successors including Poulenc, Milhaud, Cage, Stravinsky, as well as several visual artists. The semester will culminate in the close study of Satie’s provocative Dadaist ballets, Parade and Relâche.
Prerequisites: M-SK 5103; M-EX 5103 or M-LT 8102

Spring 2017

M-LT 71415 French Baroque
3 hours weekly: half-semester; 1.5 credits
No other 17th century monarch was as successful in centralizing political power as Louis XIV, a fact reflected in the musical entertainments given within the splendors of Versailles. This seminar focuses on the politics of courtly entertainment during his reign, including the controversies and challenges to royal monopoly over all musical stage works, the early form of "copyright" protection granted by the king for Francois Couperin's instrumental works, and accusations of "foreign" (read: Italian) influences in the music of Marc-Antoine Charpentier.
Prerequisites: M-SK 5103, M-LT 5101 or M-LT 8101
 
M-LT 71416 Sibelius

3 hours weekly: half-semester; 1.5 credits
This course will trace Sibelius’s career from the 1890s into the 20th century, investigating how his works relate to political, national, and religious landscapes. An in-depth analytical and contextual study of all seven symphonies will be complemented by an examination of his other orchestral works, opera, and chamber music. The critical reception of Sibelius by Adorno and others will provide an ongoing backdrop for class discussions and assignments.
Prerequisites: M-SK 5103, M-EX 5103 or M-LT 8102
 
M-LT 71417 Andriessen
3 hours weekly: half-semester; 1.5 credits
Using Yayoi Uno Everett’s monograph as a general narrative, this course will investigate the Andriessen’s contributions to modern composition and analyze his unique musical language vis-à-vis postwar aesthetics, hommages to medieval and renaissance styles, and rhetorical narratives regarding modern music. There will be a collective in-depth examination of several seminal works including De Staat, Hoketus, De Tijd, De Materie as well as later works from the 1990s and early 21st century.
Prerequisites: M-SK 5103, M-EX 5103 or M-LT 8102

M-LT 71419 Chopin
3 hours weekly: half-semester; 1.5 credits
Fryderyk Franciszek Chopin left his Polish homeland on the eve of a revolt against Russian occupation. Just over a year later, he had settled in Paris, going by the name Frédérich François Chopin. Although he served as a symbol of opposition to the Russian occupation of Poland throughout his life, he was torn continually between his pursuit of professional success through acceptance within the Parisian salon societies, and his desire to remain faithful to values of his "revolutionary-comrades" at home. This conflict was expressed in the two types of friendships he held: while artists such as Alfred De Musset and George Sand encouraged the composer to embrace personal glory as a Romantic "genius composer"—arguably at the expense of his devotion to his homeland—his associations with fellow "musical patriots" such as Franz Liszt nurtured and encouraged Chopin's nationalistic ideals. This seminar considers manifestations of this personal conflict through a consideration of the nature and circumstance of his "Polish" works (e.g., the Polonaises, mazurkas, and Polish song settings), and those written for the pleasure of his Parisian admirers.
Prerequisites: M-SK 5103, M-EX 5103 or M-LT 8102

Remedial Courses

M-LT 8101 Music History Review 1
2 hours weekly; 1 credit
Students who do not pass M-LT 5101 Music History 1 Proficiency Exam are required to register for this review course covering Early Music through the Baroque Era.
 
M-LT 8102 Music History Review 2
2 hours weekly; 1 credit
Students who do not pass M-LT 5102 Music History 2 Proficiency Exam are required to register for this review course covering music from the Classical Era through the 20th and 21st centuries.

General Music

M-PR 70912 Alexander Technique
2 hours weekly; 1 credit
An introduction to F.M. Alexander’s techniques of body and mind awareness, alignment, and relaxation for the performing musician.
 
M-PR 70910 The Creative Musician
2 hours weekly; 1 credit
Course objectives are to discern each student’s personal goals in music, to expand our awareness of what is possible to do as musicians, to cultivate each person’s creativity as an individual and as a collaborator, and to explore each student’s potential as an imaginative performer, teacher, colleague, and creative being. This course challenges students with creative assignments and materials; includes guest presenters such as innovative performers, child development specialists, and therapeutic musicians; expands awareness of other art forms; introduces modern teaching techniques such as Dalcroze and Music for People; and provides a place for open dialogue.
 
M-PR 07911 Career Skills for Musicians
2 hours weekly; 1 credit
The goal of this course is to prepare students to seek, fill, and devise opportunities for careers as musicians in the future by learning and experiencing the necessary perspectives, attitudes, and skills to pursue and maintain satisfying and profitable careers in the broad area of music. This includes producing materials to identify and promote themselves, financial, tax, and legal information; entrepreneurial projects that research and explore career possibilities; and experiencing and deepening their creative potentials as musicians, as colleagues, and as participants in our society.
 
M-SK 0991 Conducting 1
1 hour weekly; 1 credit
M-SK 0992 Conducting 2
1 hour weekly; 1 credit
Prerequisite: M-SK 0991
The elementary technique of conducting applied to both choral and instrumental music. Principles of attack and release, setting and changing tempo, phrasing and interpretation; practice in score reading.
 
M-PR 00912 Independent Study
3 hours weekly; 1 credit
M-PR 00913 Independent Study
6 hours weekly; 2 credits
Students may petition to do independent work mentored by a music division faculty member. Approval is granted when the project specified is substantive, meaningful, and is something that the individual student can accomplish through primarily independent work.

Specific Major Requirements

Choral Conducting

M-AP 0739 Conducting: Conductors' Choir
2 hours weekly; 0 credits
 
M-LT 0731 Choral Repertoire 1: Antiquity through Early Baroque Period
2 hours weekly; 1 credit
This course serves as both repertoire survey and discussion of performance practice topics from antiquity through the early Baroque. Students engage in projects centered on scholarly presentations, concert planning and programming, and assemble a database of repertoire from each period. Offered in alternate years, in fall only.
 
M-LT 0732 Choral Repertoire 2: Early Baroque through the Classical Period
2 hours weekly; 1 credit
This course serves as both repertoire survey and discussion of performance practice topics through the Baroque period. Students engage in projects centered on scholarly presentations, concert planning and programming, and assemble a database of repertoire from each period. Offered in alternate years, in spring only.
 
M-LT 0733 Choral Repertoire 3: 19th Century Music
2 hours weekly; 1 credit
This course serves as both repertoire survey and discussion of performance practice topics during the 19th century. Students engage in projects centered on scholarly presentations, concert planning and programming, and assemble a database of repertoire from each period. Offered in alternate years, in fall only.
 
M-LT 0734 Choral Repertoire 4: 20th and 21st Century Music
2 hours weekly; 1 credit
This course serves as both repertoire survey and discussion of performance practice topics from the 20th century to the present day. Students engage in projects centered on scholarly presentations, concert planning and programming, and assemble a database of repertoire from each period. Offered in alternate years, in spring only.

M-LT 0735 Score Study: A Cappella Masterworks
2 hours weekly; 1 credit
Conductors will develop and implement a detailed practice of score study that leads to focused and productive rehearsals, greater understanding of compositional characteristics of specific composers, and expands knowledge of the repertoire of a cappella masterworks. This course provides academic study of the repertoire for the Seminar in Conducting: Choral and is a more detailed study of the trends explored in the Choral Repertoire classes.

M-LT 0736 Score Study: Choral/ Orchestral Masterworks
2 hours weekly; 1 credit
Conductors will develop and implement a detailed practice of score study that leads to focused and productive rehearsals, greater understanding of compositional characteristics of specific composers, and expands knowledge of the repertoire of Choral/Orchestral masterworks. This course provides academic study of the repertoire for the Seminar in Conducting: Choral and is a more detailed study of the trends explored in the Choral Repertoire classes.
 
M-SK 5731 Score Study Practicum
2 hours weekly; 1 credit

Collaborative Piano

M-ST 0629 Seminar for Collaborative Pianists
2 hours weekly; 1 credit

Composition

M-SK 0301 Orchestration 1
2 hours weekly; 2 credits
M-SK 0302 Orchestration  2
2 hours weekly; 2 credits
This sequence provides the student with opportunities to creatively apply the basic knowledge of instrument families to homogeneous ensembles. Familiarity with and analysis of traditional and exceptional musical examples will provide the basis for the student’s own work.
 
M-SK 0391 Electronic Music 1
2 hours weekly; 2 credits
 
M-SK 0392 Electronic Music 2
2 hours weekly; 2 credits
Prerequisite: M-SK 0391

Music Education

M-LT 0051 Child Growth and Human Development

(Undergraduate) 3 hours weekly; 3 credits
(Graduate) 3 hours weekly; 2 credits
The study of normal growth and development from childhood through maturity, with emphasis on cognitive processes, language development, and patterns of psycho-social development. Explores the social and cultural contexts in which growth and development occur. Students demonstrate openness and objectivity towards issues and theories by inspecting their own biases.
 
M-LT 5051 Foundations of Education

44 hours total; 3 credits
Philosophy and history of education. Emphasis on the leading contemporary educational philosophies, the development of American education, and the historical influences on the organization and structure of contemporary public schools. Students will examine and define their personal educational philosophy. Offered summers through the Institute for Music Education.
 
M-LT 5053 Special Needs and the Gifted Child

8.5 hours total; 0.5 credits
Methods of identifying children with special gifts and talents in the arts, and children with disabilities and strategies for adapting or enhancing music lessons to meet the needs of both the gifted and the needy. Identification of the emotional, physical, and intellectual characteristics of gifted and special needs students. Exploration of techniques for establishing special programs for special children, as well as ideas for including special children in existing music programs. Exposure to legal issues related to special needs children and special education. Offered summers through the Institute for Music Education.
 
M-LT 5057 Seminar in Music Education
3 hours weekly; 3 credits

M-LT 5151 American Music
14 hours total; 1 credit
Focused study of the music of the United States of America in the 19th and 20th centuries. Discussion of appropriate pedagogical approaches to teaching American music to students in K–12 schools.
 
M-LT 5153 World Music
24 hours total; 2 credits
Focused study of the pedagogical and performance practices of music in several cultures around the world. Students will be required to perform and teach selected repertoire.
 
M-LT 6051 Introduction to Autism Spectrum Disorders
3 hours weekly; 3 credits
This course provides class participants with an overview of characteristics, etiology, and prevalence of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Course participants will examine the psychological, physiological, neurological, social, behavioral, communicative and learning characteristics of individuals with ASD. Instructional supports & strategies, as well as collaboration with individuals, families, professionals, and community will be explored.

M-LT 6052 Autism, Music, and Behavioral Teaching Methods
3 hours weekly; 3 credits
This course will explore cutting-edge approaches and strategies for teaching music to individuals on the autism spectrum. Through readings and peer teaching, students will investigate, test, and critique intersections between established teaching techniques in special education and the teaching of music in classroom and one-on-one settings.
 
M-LT 6055 Music Education Thesis                               
3 credits
An independent research project that culminates in a paper of at least 50 pages in length and includes some original research, through one or more of the following: review of the literature, experimental study, observation, interview, survey, or reflective writing. Supervised by a Music Education faculty member who has a terminal degree.

M-PR 0051 Student Directed Study in Music Education         
0.5–3 credits                        
Students may petition to do independent work mentored by an education or a music division faculty member. Approval is granted when the project specified is substantive, meaningful, and is something that the individual student can accomplish through primarily independent work.
 
M-PR 5051 Classroom Strategies and Approaches 1
2 hours weekly plus observations; 1 credit
M-PR 5052 Classroom Strategies and Approaches 2
2 hours weekly plus observations; 1 credit
Prerequisite: M-PR 5051
Examines the concepts of comprehensive musicianship, including the development of strategies required to lead music activities in a variety of contexts and scenarios. Exploration and practice of observation techniques appropriate for viewing a wide range of instrumental and vocal performances. Hands-on experience with materials appropriate for the general music classroom. Continued investigation of instructional media hardware and software commonly used in middle school and music classrooms. Each semester includes a minimum of 40 hours of field based pre-practicum observations in a variety of music educational settings and grade levels.

M-PR 5053 Teaching Students on the Autism Spectrum Conference
Hours vary; 0.5 credits  
In this intensive tutorial, students will design and conduct independent research projects on various topics in music education and autism. The course will conclude with a class research conference in which students will present their findings to each other and to the broader community. When appropriate, students will prepare their work for publication or presentation at other venues.

M-PR 6051 Music Education and Autism Practicum
Hours vary; 3 credits
This course provides students with a forum to discuss and share their work with individuals on the autism spectrum. Through observations, readings, writing assignments, class discussions, and a practicum placement, students will bring theory to practice, as they gain valuable experience teaching music to students on the autism spectrum in a range of settings.

M-PR 6053 Teaching Practicum and Seminar
Seminar portion: 28 hours total; 4 credits
The capstone experience of the educator preparation program, the practicum is ordinarily full-time for at least 12 weeks at one or two sites, and often extends over a full 14-week semester. It includes a minimum of 300 hours of which at least 150 hours include full teaching responsibility; a minimum of 150 hours involves teaching at any two of the following levels: elementary (K–5), middle school (5–8), and high school (9–12). During the practicum semester the student teacher is mentored by qualified supervising practitioner or practitioners at the school site(s), and by a Music Education faculty member. The teaching practicum seminar brings together all undergraduate and graduate students doing their practicum in a given semester and explores issues common to the teaching experiences of all the participants, supported by readings and focused discussion.
 
M-SK 5051 Music Technology and the Music Educator 1
10 hours total; 0.5 credits
Study of instructional media software, synthesizers, synthesizer theory, and Macintosh music applications; with particular attention to the interfacing of synthesizers and computers (MIDI). Work with teacher-made instructional materials via MIDI applications; assignments are closely linked to the work of ED 575: Arranging 1. Practical experience with media hardware. Offered summers through the Institute for Music Education.
 
M-SK 5052 Music Technology and the Music Educator 2
10 hours total; 0.5 credits
Continued study of instructional media software, synthesizers, synthesizer theory, and music applications; with particular attention to the interfacing of synthesizers and computers (MIDI). Work with teacher-made instructional materials via MIDI applications; assignments are closely linked to the work of M-SK 5151 Arranging 2. Practical experience with media hardware. Offered summers through the Institute for Music Education.
 
M-SK 5053 Music in the Elementary Classroom
57 hours total; 2.5 credits
An in-depth examination of the procedures and materials for teaching general classroom music to children in grades K–6. Development of skills in analyzing teaching materials, setting instructional goals and objectives, and writing lesson plans designed to assist the child in becoming musically literate. Includes an introduction to conceptual approaches to music teaching such as Orff-Schulwerk, Kodaly, Dalcroze, and Gordon; examination of the use of Eurhythmics in developing musicianship skills through movement; and exploration of classroom management issues.
 
M-SK 5054 Secondary Specialized Ensemble and Non-Performance Classes
56 hours total; 2.5 credits
Methods and materials pertinent to the education of junior and senior high school students in specialized ensembles (jazz band, marching band) and non-performance classes (general music, music appreciation). Exposure to content areas, discipline approaches, teaching strategies, classroom organization, lesson organization, and instructional presentation necessary for the secondary school classroom. Examination of contemporary teaching strategies, organizational considerations, and components of current curriculum designs.

M-SK 5151 Arranging 1
8 hours total; 0.5 credits
Arranging for various instrumental combinations. Choral arranging with emphasis on current music for classroom instruction in grades K–6. Development of arranging skills from piano lead sheets and piano arrangements; study of instrumentation, including range, transposition and timbre. Work in arranging builds on simultaneous explorations of software packages in M-SK 5051 Music Technology 1.

M-SK 5152 Arranging 2
10 hours total; 0.5 credits
Advanced experience arranging for various instrumental combinations, including concert and jazz band. Choral arranging with emphasis on current music for classroom instruction in grades 7–12. Development of arranging skills from piano lead sheets and piano arrangements; study of instrumentation, including range, transposition, and timbre. Work in arranging builds on simultaneous explorations of software packages in M-SK 5052 Music Technology 2. Prerequisite M-SK 5151

M-SK 5951 Conducting Workshop 1
34 hours total; 1 credit
Fundamentals of baton technique, elementary score reading, and musical leadership. Practical experience in conducting laboratory ensemble. Introduction to basic conducting patterns, principles of attack and release, setting and changing tempi, phrasing and interpretation, score reading, and instrument transposition. Some focus on literature appropriate to grades K–6.
 
M-SK 5952 Conducting Workshop 2
48 hours total; 1.5 credits
Emphasis on advanced conducting technique as applied to the standard repertoire of instrumental and choral music in the secondary school. Concentration on rehearsal techniques, score preparation and analysis, cueing and gestures, and developing proficiency in manual and aural skills. Practical experience in conducting laboratory ensemble (includes participation in Laboratory Ensemble).
Prerequisite: M-SK 5952
 
M-ST 5051 Instrumental Techniques 1: Brass
Heterogeneous class lessons in brass instruments (trumpet, horn, trombone, euphonium, and tuba) emphasizing tone qualities, basic technique, embouchure, articulation and transposition, and ranges. Investigation of relevant teaching materials and pedagogy; examination of performance problems encountered by beginning instrumental students.
 
M-ST 5052 Instrumental Techniques 1: Winds
Heterogeneous class lessons in woodwind instruments (flute, oboe, bassoon, clarinet, and saxophone) emphasizing tone qualities, basic technique, embouchure, articulation and transposition, and ranges. Investigation of relevant teaching materials and pedagogy; examination of performance problems encountered by beginning instrumental students.
 
M-EN 5051 Instrumental Techniques 1 Conducting Lab
46 hours total; 2 credits
The associated laboratory ensemble for M-ST 5051 and M-ST 5052. M-ST 5051, M-ST 5052, and M-EN 5051 are all 46 hours total and 2 credits.
 
M-ST 5053 Instrumental Techniques 2: Strings
Provides basic knowledge of string and percussion instruments. Heterogeneous class lessons on violin, viola, cello, and double bass, with special attention given to basic technique, fingering, positions, bowings, tuning, articulation, materials, teaching methods, and string literature; includes fundamentals in first position and examination of the Suzuki method.
 
M-ST 5054 Instrumental Techniques 2: Percussion
Work with percussion instruments (snare drum, mallets, drum set, crash cymbals, and handheld percussion instruments) concentrates on beginning methods and materials, basic technique, materials, and instruments.
 
M-EN 5052 Instrumental Techniques 2 Conducting Lab
48 hours total; 2 credits
The associated laboratory ensemble for M-ST 5051 and M-ST 5052. M-ST 5053, M-ST 5054, and M-EN 5052 are all 48 hours total and 2 credits.
 
M-ST 5055 Choral Methods and Materials: Elementary
20 hours total; 1 credit
Working with the treble voice; appropriate teaching techniques, selection of suitable music for the young voice, and programming. Includes a study of objectives for elementary classes and consideration of methods and materials; work on techniques of vocal production, including breathing, and voice placement, with special emphasis on choral singing. Students participate in singing and conducting selected works.
 
M-ST 5056 Choral Methods and Materials: Secondary
20 hours total; 1 credit
Work with the development of the adolescent voice. Study of standard repertoire for secondary choral ensembles, including jazz, show, and small ensembles; programming and rehearsal techniques, auditioning, part placement, balance and blend, and tone. Continued study of vocal technique, including breathing and voice placement, with special emphasis on choral singing. Emphasis on appropriate teaching techniques, which include musical literacy and styles. Students participate in singing and conducting selected works.
 
M-ST 5057 Instrumental Methods and Materials: Elementary
20 hours total; 1 credit
Study of methods and materials of instrumental music in the elementary school, with emphasis on teaching techniques and pedagogy for beginners. Special attention is given to classroom instruments, including Orff instruments, guitar, and soprano recorder. Basic techniques of chordal and melodic playing are introduced. Students participate in conducting and performing selected works.
 
M-ST 5058 Instrumental Methods and Materials: Secondary
20 hours total; 1 credit
Large Ensemble Methods and materials for teaching instrumental music in large ensembles in junior and senior high schools. Focus on concert band and orchestra, with emphasis on instrumental organization and administration, pedagogical practices, guiding student behavior, assessment, and professional responsibilities. Includes an exploration of the standard repertoire for string ensembles, symphonic orchestra, and concert band.

Orchestral Conducting

M-AP 0909 Conducting: Conductors' Orchestra
2 hours weekly; 0 credits
 
M-ST 0909 Seminar in Conducting: Orchestral

2 hours weekly; 2 credits
Sophisticated investigation of the technique of conducting with a focus on instrumental music. The primary technical emphasis is on the clarity and effectiveness of one’s conducting gestures and leadership, with supporting emphases on the knowledge of orchestral instruments, repertoire, and group dynamics. Repertoire studied is based largely on works being rehearsed and performed by the Conservatory’s large ensembles.

Piano

M-LT 0601 Piano Literature 1
1 hour weekly; 1 credit
 
M-LT 0602 Piano Literature 2
1 hour weekly; 1 credit
 
M-LT 0603 Piano Literature 3
1 hour weekly; 1 credit
 
M-LT 0604 Piano Literature 4
1 hour weekly; 1 credit
 
M-SK 0661 Keyboard Harmony 1
2 hours weekly; 2 credits
M-SK 0662 Keyboard Harmony 2
2 hours weekly; 2 credits
Prerequisite: M-SK 0661
Applied keyboard skills for piano majors with emphasis on harmonization (diatonic and chromatic functions), transposition, and traditional figured bass realization. Styles of harmonization extend from traditional accompaniment patterns to an introduction of contemporary 7th and 9th chords and lead sheet harmonization.
 
M-SK 0663 Keyboard Techniques
1 hour weekly; 1 credit
An intensive and personally fitted overview of piano technique (scales, arpeggios, double notes, touches, etc.), score-reading, and sight-reading techniques.

Strings

M-ST 0401 Orchestral Excerpts
1.5 hours bi-weekly; 1 credit
Preparation of standard orchestral excerpts essential in the competition for positions with all ensembles. Required of fourth-year violin, viola, and cello majors.

Voice

Diction

Graduate Diction is a course in the elements of phonetics and diction, making use of the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) to examine the sounds of Italian and German (Fall Semester) and French and English (Spring Semester), and to apply them to the texts of songs and arias. More attention will be given to actual performance capabilities and the languages will be examined at an advanced level.

M-SK 5701 Graduate Diction 1
2 hours weekly; 1 credit
 
M-SK 5702 Graduate Diction 2
2 hours weekly; 1 credit
 
M-SK 0711 Diction: Italian

2 hours weekly; 1 credit
Development of proper Italian enunciation for singing, an intensified application of the International Phonetic Alphabet, and a more sophisticated understanding of the Italian language through the study and performance of the repertoire.

M-SK 0712 Diction: German
2 hours weekly; 1 credit
Development of proper German enunciation for singing, an intensified application of the International Phonetic Alphabet, and a more sophisticated understanding of the language through the study and performance of the repertoire.
 
M-SK 0713 Diction: French
2 hours weekly; 1 credit
Development of proper French enunciation for singing, an intensified application of the International Phonetic Alphabet, and a more sophisticated understanding of the French language through the study and performance of the repertoire.
 
M-SK 0714 Diction: English and American
2 hours weekly; 1 credit
Development of proper enunciation for singing in English, through the study and performance of the repertoire, a more intensified application of the International Phonetic Alphabet, and training in the correction of regional speech.

Repertoire

M-LT 0711 Song Repertoire: Italian
2 hours weekly; 1 credit
A survey of the Italian song repertoire through lecture, discussion, and performance with a concentration on salient composers in the Italian language.
 
M-LT 0712 Song Repertoire: German
2 hours weekly; 1 credit
A survey of the German song repertoire through lecture, discussion, and performance with a concentration on the important poets and composers in the German language.

M-LT 0713 Song Repertoire: French
2 hours weekly; 1 credit
A survey of the French song repertoire through lecture, discussion, and performance, with a concentration on the important poets and composers in the language.
 
M-LT 0714 Song Repertoire: English and American
2 hours weekly; 1 credit
A survey of the English and American song repertoire through lecture, discussion, and performance with a concentration on the salient poets and composers of England and America.
 
M-ST 77913 Oratorio Repertoire
2 hours weekly; 1 credit
A survey of the history, performance practice, and repertoire of oratorio studied through lecture, performance, and coaching of arias and ensembles from selected oratorios from throughout the history of the genre.
 
M-ST 77916 Early Music Repertoire
2 hours weekly; 1 credit
This one-semester course is an exploration of the solo vocal repertoire composed before 1800, with special emphasis on nine selected genres. The course includes class lectures, preparation and coaching of music, and written and performance projects.
 
M-ST 77917 International Repertoire
2 hours weekly; 1 credit
An overview of song repertoire not covered in French, Italian, German, and English courses; namely, Russian/Slavic, Spanish/Iberian, and Scandinavian song repertoire.
 
M-AP 0701 Vocal Coaching

1/2 hour coaching weekly; 1 credit
Individual instruction in the interpretation, phrasing, diction, and style in all genres of the vocal repertoire. In collaboration with the applied lesson instructor, the vocal coach will assist in the choice and preparation of repertoire to be presented in required recitals.
 
M-EN 0701 Vocal/Piano Duos

2 hours weekly; 1 credit
An examination of the song repertoire of a single major composer through the lens of collaboration. A performance based repertoire class addressing the basic skills of ensemble, balance, style, and interpretation.

Opera

M-ST 0711 Acting for Singers 1
4 hours weekly; 1.5 credits
M-ST 0712 Acting for Singers 2
4 hours weekly; 1.5 credits
Prerequisite: M-ST 0711
Basic principles of truthful acting. The sequence moves from foundation exercises to experience with monologues and scene work.

M-EN 0791 Opera Workshop (Audition only)
4 hours weekly; 1 credit
The Opera Workshop builds on the fundamentals learned in Introduction to Opera and through the student’s previous experience. Through interactive discussion, exercises, experiential projects, and the preparation and performance of appropriate arias and scenes, students will expand their knowledge base and experience practical application of the concepts and techniques they learn. Appropriate repertoire will be assigned, coached, rehearsed, and presented both in-class and in public performances.
 
M-EN 0793 Opera Studio (Audition only)
6-10 hours weekly; 1 credit
Opera Studio is the advanced performing ensemble of the Opera department. The emphasis of Opera Studio will be on application of the knowledge and technique learned throughout the curriculum in the preparation and performance of operatic repertoire. The class will include intensive coaching and musical preparation of mainstage operas, as well as coachings and musical and staging rehearsals for scenes programs, outreach events, one-acts, and the concert opera. In-class as well as public performances will be presented by the Opera Studio ensemble.
 
M-LT 77911 Characterization

2 hours weekly; 1 credit
Students learn the process of developing an operatic character, beginning with in-depth research into the opera, its source material, musical and dramatic values, and performance history. Context for the opera’s plot, including period, location, social milieu, and thematic material is also explored. With this foundation in place, the students identify character attributes, craft appropriate back story, examine relationships with other characters, and explore the inner life and outer physicality of the character. Finally, they carefully consider the character’s intentions and the obstacles to achieving them, from which they construct a range of acceptable choices of action to play in performance. Students will explore the character’s physicality and inner life through various performance exercises and will prepare and present an aria from the role in class.
 
M-LT 77912 The Drama of the Score
2 hours weekly; 1 credit
An introduction to the musical language of opera. Exploration of the musical and physical drama inherent in the orchestral score. Analysis of the operatic score as a tool for making dramatic and physical choices in the performance of arias from all historical periods and styles.
 
M-SK 0701 Introduction to Opera Performance
4 hours weekly; 1 credit
This one-semester course introduces students to the basic skills that are needed in performing opera. The focus of the course is on the development of the singing actor’s physical and emotional “instruments” and the coordination of these with their vocalism. Specific areas of study include: basic stage deportment, the nature of energy and its physical and emotional application for the performer, theatrical elements and how they affect character development and performance practice, making active choices as a performer, and balancing core truth with theatricality and stylistic considerations. The class is highly interactive and experiential, combining class discussions with various exercises. Students apply what they are learning to the performance of arias and/or songs for feedback and workshop within the class. There is no public performance aspect to this course.
 
M-SK 0721 The Business of the Opera Business

2 hours weekly; 1 credit
This course offers practical approaches to the business aspects of building and sustaining a career in professional opera. Presentations by faculty and guest industry professionals will cover such topics as writing a personal mission statement, building a brand identity, creating business plans, assembling a team of advisors, working with agents and managers, tax advice for singers, financial planning for short- and long-term goals, surviving survival jobs, living in New York City, finding a voice teacher and/or coach, and building a website. The course will also discuss life on the road, including how to be a good colleague, manage company expectations, and get rehired; how to maintain vocal, physical, and emotional health while away from home; and guidance related to working abroad. Facing career transitions, including setting benchmarks for success and exploring other career trajectories within the business, will be discussed. Open to undergraduates by permission only.

Movement 

M-ST 77910 Movement for Singers 1
2 hours weekly; 1 credit

M-ST 77911 Movement for Singers 2
2 hours weekly; 1 credit
Prerequisite: M-ST 77910
Designed to give the singing performer greater knowledge of and ability with their physical instrument. Introduction to basic dance steps, period movement, styles, and dances often required in operatic productions, and some basic ballet. Movement exercises from various well-known techniques in expressive bodywork (i.e., Chekhov, Bogart, Wesley Balk, Grotowski) as well as stage combat and some relaxation and massage techniques.

M-ST 77912 Aria Class
2 hours weekly; 1 credit
A performing and coaching class to which singers bring arias for performance practice as well as for coaching on diction, style, character, and vocal presentation.
 
M-ST 77914 Recitative
2 hours weekly; 1 credit
A study of recitativo in opera and oratorio in all languages and styles, including detailed work on the recitativo secco of Mozart and Rossini.

M-ST 77915 Audition Techniques
2 hours weekly; 1 credit
This course is a performance class focused on preparing students to be more effective in auditions. Students will prepare and present a minimum of three audition arias that best reflect their talent and abilities, while satisfying language requirements and covering a variety of musical styles. Lectures and interactive discussions will be held on how to present yourself as a complete, consistent, and industry-ready package; understanding auditioning as a career-long process; creating effective audition materials; appropriate wardrobe and grooming; audition procedures and etiquette; contact with companies to arrange auditions, ask questions, and follow-up; creating a seasonal audition plan, including targeting appropriate companies, setting realistic goals, and monitoring progress. The class culminates in a mock audition for a panel of faculty and guest industry professionals.

Vocal Pedagogy

M-PD 5741 History of Vocal Pedagogy
2 hours weekly; 2 credits
In-depth study of past and present theories of breathing, registration, phonation, resonance, and instruction practices. Topics include; comparative analysis, objective reviewing pre/post development of technology, and study of vocal practices throughout history. Course covers both musical theater and classical pedagogies.
 
M-PD 5742 Structure and Function of the Singing Mechanism
4 hours weekly; 2 credits
An introduction to vocal health, voice disorders, pathologies, and critical listening, and in-depth study of the anatomy in relation to breath, phonation, resonance, and articulators. This course includes visits to Massachusetts General Hospital for clinical observations to enhance the anatomical understanding. Actual class meeting time is two hours per week with an additional two hours per week meeting as assigned.
 
M-PD 5743 Repertoire for the Teaching Studio

2 hours weekly; 1 credit
Introduction to classical and musical theater repertoire as an instructional tool for the applied voice studio. Students will learn repertoire and learn to objectively study new repertoire to enhance the technical teaching process. Students must attend five studio voice recitals each semester outside of their own studio.
 
M-PD 6741 Comparative Pedagogy
1 hour weekly; 1 credit
Students will observe voice instruction in the applied studio. Students will also demonstrate teaching skills in front of the classroom for feedback from students and instructor(s). Students will either work with new students or continue with students from previous semester. Actual class meeting time is one hour per week with an additional one hour per week meeting as assigned.
 
M-PD 6743 Voice Instruction Practicum

1 hour weekly; 1 credit
Students will teach one student of the opposite gender for 10 weeks. Course activities include group discussion of the practicum experiences, discussions about specific technical issues/inefficiencies, instructor feedback on the teaching, and guidance on how to development a voice studio. In addition, students will learn how to create a curriculum vitae, how to write a cover letter, and discuss ways to seek or create employment after graduation.
 
M-PD 6742 Advanced Pedagogy
2 hours, 1 credit

Electives

M-SK 0703 Linklater: Body, Voice, Text
2 hours, 1 credit
In depth practice of the body, voice, and text work defined by theater visionary and practitioner Kristen Linklater in her book, Freeing the Natural Voice.

M-LT 77910 Special Topics in Voice: Song Analysis Through Text
2 hours weekly; 1 credit
This one-semester course is a detailed exploration of the art song genre, especially its poetic and musical content and related performance issues. The course includes class lectures, analysis of selected works, and written and performance projects.